Facing Uncertainty with Faith

Man facing a wall of waterLast year, I wrote a blog post called “Diving through the Waves of Uncertainty.” It’s a personal story of when I was 17. I was faced with a barrage of persecution, contradiction, and what I now call “scornography.” Fortunately, with the help of the Holy Spirit, I was able to find my way. I’m sharing this link here because I feel prompted to share it. It might help someone who’s passing through the same fire.

Scornography

I see scornography—media that mocks, belittles, blames, slams, and tears down—the same way I see pornography. If you spend time with it, it’s venom will cross the blood-brain barrier and spread like black ink across your mind. It will bind you and block your ability to see and understand God’s hand in your life. There’s not much difference between the two when you consider the damage they cause.

A Mountain to Climb

We all have the same mountain to climb. We’ll climb different faces, hike trails of our choosing, meander from camp to camp at the base. That doesn’t matter much. What matters is that God our Father stands at the peak, offering His help. If we can manage to lift our eyes from the trail we’re on at the moment, we might just see Him there. He is always willing to help when we ask for it with all our hearts. This I know for certain.

For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end. Then shall ye call upon me, and ye shall go and pray unto me, and I will hearken unto you. And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart. (Jeremiah 29:11–13.)

In spite of grinding weakness, I keep looking for the top of the mountain. In tatters, bloodied knees, and a broken spirit, I intend to keep climbing. I don’t know if I’ll reach it in one piece or not, but for now, I’m taking one step, one confession, one slice of humble, and one prayer at a time.

The Six Destructive Ds

https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2009/04/faith-in-the-lord-jesus-christ?lang=eng

Over the last few days, I’ve listened to Elder Kevin Pearson’s conference talk on faith in the Lord Christ (given in April 2009) several times. I was particularly fascinated by his “Six Destructive Ds.” I share them here (emphasis mine).

First is doubt. Doubt is not a principle of the gospel.It does not come from the Light of Christ or the influence of the Holy Ghost. Doubt is a negative emotion related to fear. It comes from a lack of confidence in one’s self or abilities. It is inconsistent with our divine identity as children of God.

Doubt leads to discouragement. Discouragement comes from missed expectations. Chronic discouragement leads to lower expectations, decreased effort, weakened desire, and greater difficulty feeling and following the Spirit (see Preach My Gospel [2004], 10). Discouragement and despair are the very antithesis of faith.

Discouragement leads to distraction, a lack of focus. Distraction eliminates the very focus the eye of faith requires. Discouragement and distraction are two of Satan’s most effective tools, but they are also bad habits.

Distraction leads to a lack of diligence,a reduced commitment to remain true and faithful and to carry on through despite hardship and disappointment. Disappointment is an inevitable part of life, but it need not lead to doubt, discouragement, distraction, or lack of diligence.

If not reversed, this path ultimately leads to disobedience, which undermines the very basis of faith. So often the result is disbelief, the conscious or unconscious refusal to believe.

The scriptures describe disbelief as the state of having chosen to harden one’s heart. It is to be past feeling.

These Six Destructive Ds—doubt, discouragement, distraction, lack of diligence, disobedience, and disbelief—all erode and destroy our faith. We can choose to avoid and overcome them.

I loved his statement, “Doubt is not a principle of the gospel.” If it is not a principle of the gospel, where does it come from? Four times in scripture we are commanded specifically to “doubt not” (Matthew 21:21; Mormon 9:27; Doctrine and Covenants 6:36; 8:8.) Because of these verses, I believe that not doubting is actually a principle of the gospel.

7 Classes of Doubt

Courtesy LDS Media LibraryDoubt is normal and common. We are not going to escape doubt any more than we are going to escape temptation or affliction in this life. But as we grow stronger spiritually, doubt loses its sticking power.

Here are 7 classes or flavors of doubt. Are there more? Probably. Are these based on a double-blind, peer-reviewed study? Nope. These are only my life observations. (If you have tweak or one to add, please drop me a comment. I’ll add it and credit you.)

1. Normal doubt

We all experience doubt at one time or another. It’s part of our human wiring for survival. It’s okay to experience doubt, but if doubt drives us away from the truth or from loved ones or common sense or peace of mind, it’s probably more than normal doubt. This kind of doubt is the most temporary.

2. Accidental doubt

You chance on a conversation or some written or visual material, without seeking it, that casts confusion and doubt upon something you have believed for many years, perhaps your whole life. It puts a knot in your tummy. But as you have time to consider it for a few days, the doubt dissipates and you integrate the new notions with your current beliefs or forget about them. It’s not hard to recover from this kind of doubt.

3. Careless doubt

You don’t keep your eyes and ears and heart within wise boundaries. As you sling your attention around Interwebical vastness, you find the unsavory, the dark, the bleak, the lurid, the accusatory. It makes you sick as much as it makes you wonder. You have a hard time filtering this version of doubt. It pummels you, and you may even seek it out for a season, but you eventually shake it off (though they haunt your thoughts from time to time). Or it may take you down a valley road.

4. Obsessive doubt

This doubt thumps you hard. It’s like a fish hook—hard to pull out without pain an injury. It is known by it’s most common name worry. It rolls around in your mind day and night. It won’t leave you alone. Normal relief does not come in a matter of days. It keeps pounding you, day in and day out. It takes you weeks, months, and perhaps years to shake this serpent off.

5. Intellectual doubt

This doubt comes as a result of intellectual inquiry while setting aside spiritual inquiry. It is a lopsided doubt that denies, then denies, and denies. In order for this kind of doubt to flourish, you have to shut 3/4 of the windows in your mind and pull the shades. It is marked by pride, argument, put downs, and a host of relationship killers. When the need to assert your intellect exceeds your need for human connection, especially with those you love and have made covenants with, the fangs have set in and you are taking on venom. You are spiritually poisoned under the guise of intellectual “purity.” This one takes time to sort out and recover from.

6. Wilful doubt

Wilful sin produces wilful doubt. Consciously and perhaps defiantly going against what you know is right produces this type of doubt. It drains the soul of memories or reconfigures them. It turns its back on good habits, common sense, virtue, friends, family, promises, covenants, and eventually, hope. This doubt takes root when sin takes charge and becomes anger driven. Stubborn addictions are often present. The natural man gorges on this kind of doubt. Survival and recovery rates are low and slow, but this is not a hopeless case. In my view, there are no hopeless cases.

7. Nefarious doubt

Finally, we have descended to nefarious doubt. This kinds of doubt drags the doubter, and all he or she can take along with them, down to hell. This doubt knowingly, willfully, and gleefully casts doubt on nearly everything. It has a mission call to the Hades South Mission. It is devil inspired and devil driven. It is the doubt of the spiritual sociopath. It leans on the doorbell of perdition. It’s bad news. Really bad. Survival and recovery rates are the lowest. Once again, as long as there is a God in heaven, there is hope.

Soon, I’ll post something on the remedies to doubt.