Farewell, Thomas S. Monson

IMG_4793On Thursday morning, January 11, I was blessed to attend the viewing of President Thomas S. Monson at the Conference Center where he lay in state in the Hall of the Prophets. There was a presence there, a great peace. I “heard” the whispers of unseen angels. It was solemn yet joyful. I loved the feeling so much that I went again at 3 o’clock that afternoon with a friend. It was an unforgettable experience for me.

I’m sad to see President Monson go, but I am also very happy for him and for his beloved Francis who went before him several years earlier. What a reunion that must have been. The doorway of death is, reportedly, not a frightening one but rather one to look forward to. I look forward to it myself, but not until I complete my mission—on the Lord’s timetable. Let’s not rush it.

My wife and I were able to attend the funeral the next day, Friday, January 12, also in the Conference Center. I’ve watched many of these funerals over satellite or on television, the first being the funeral of President Spencer W. Kimball in November 1985. I was deeply moved by the remarks Friday, especially from President Monson’s daughter, Ann M. Dibb, and from President Russell M. Nelson, on whose shoulders the prophetic mantle has fallen as president of the Quorum of the Twelve.

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I’ve been watching some of President Monson’s past conference talks. If you want to listen to a classic, try this one, “Abundantly Blessed,” the closing address of the April 2008 general conference where he was sustained as president of the Church. It is pretty funny and comforting (about 10 minutes long).

President Monson was sustained as a member of the Twelve when I was five years old. I became acquainted with his positive, kind voice when I was 18, shortly after I joined the Church. I’ll continue to miss him, but I am delighted that his mortal trials are behind him, finally.

God bless you, Tom Monson. You’ve been a light and an example to me for all my adult life. The world needed you. I needed you too.

Cease from Anger (Part 3)

https://www.lds.org/media-library/images/jesus-christ-good-samaritan-1402940?lang=eng

When the Savior came to the Americas near the end of 34 AD, these were among the first words he spoke:

For verily, verily I say unto you, he that hath the spirit of contention is not of me, but is of the devil, who is the father of contention, and he stirreth up the hearts of men to contend with anger, one with another. Behold, this is not my doctrine, to stir up the hearts of men with anger, one against another; but this is my doctrine, that such things should be done away. (3 Nephi 11:29–30.)

Compare this with a verse of scripture from the Doctrine and Covenants, one that I lean on constantly:

And that which doth not edify is not of God, and is darkness. (Doctrine and Covenants 50:23.)

Let’s think about these verses for a moment. If we are contentious, we are following the father of contention, the devil, and if we are saying something that is not edifying (or building up), it is not of God.

I’m sorry to say that at times I’m contentious and sometimes what I say is not very edifying (like, um, today). For me, both these weaknesses grow out of frustration, which grows out of impatience, which grows out of a lack of faith.

I am working on these natural-man habits. In fact, it’s a daily battle. Progress is ever so slight, but I give myself credit for every victory, small or great.

These quotes about the Twelve inspire me. First one is from Elder Neil L. Anderson:

“I’ll just speak of the Twelve, but in the . . . years I’ve been there, I’ve never seen anyone raise their voice. Never seen them angry. Never seen them sarcastic. Never seen them in an attitude of putting somebody down or even putting an idea down.”

Next from President Gordon B. Hinckley:

I have never observed serious discord or personal enmity among my Brethren. I have, rather, observed a beautiful and remarkable thing—the coming together, under the directing influence of the Holy Spirit and under the power of revelation, of divergent views until there is total harmony and full agreement. . . . I know of no other governing body of any kind of which this might be said.

That’s a pretty high standard to live up to, and I am so grateful that these men do live up to it. I look up to them. I am grateful for their examples. I want to follow them just as they follow Christ.

I can do better. We can do better. We can all “cease from anger.”

Cease from anger, and forsake wrath: fret not thyself in any wise to do evil (Psalms 37:8; emphasis added).

P.S. Here are the other posts in the series: Cease from Anger (Part 1) and Cease from Anger (Part 2).