Dusty Smith’s Trial of Faith

I recently found Dusty Smith’s book Trial of Faith (also by Kimiko Christensen Hammari). It sort of waved me down. It was next to a larger book at waist level on a shelf at Deseret Book in Spanish Fork. I was not having a great day but it was about to get better. Something said, “You’ll want to pick up that book.” I took it in hand and bought the intriguing little volume forthwith.

I finished reading it the next day. It moved me. Dusty’s story is not candy coated. I was amazed by his honesty. He confesses his online antagonism —bitter, hate-filled, and frequent over two decades. But then something changed and his heart started to soften. The patience, understanding, and good humor of his now good friend Mike Robertson helped a lot.

Miracles came. Many, many miracles. Miracles so convincing that they seem more real than “reality.” Like the time (starting on page 60) when Dusty was deathly ill and his son innocently let a pair of missionaries into the house when he was not up to seeing anyone.

“You’re sick,” the missionaries observed.

“I’m not just sick,” replied Dusty, “I’m dying. Now please get out of my house.”

“Can we at least give you a blessing first?”

A hinge point. “If it’ll get you out of my house, then yes.”

They gave him a blessing and this is what happened. “I felt instant relief,” he reported. “I was immediately and completely healed. My fever broke, and I was able to get out bed even though I wasn’t able to just a few minutes before. I walked the missionaries downstairs and asked them to never come back . . . [but] I was left with a nagging feeling to read my mission journal, and I kept thinking about the Church. Was God trying to tell me something? Why did the missionaries just happen to knock on my door that day?”

That’s just one of many miracles that led a man who once had a Korihor-rible (John Bytheway’s word) attitude about the Church to someone who had his testimony resurrected, was rebaptized, came back into full faith, and had his story retold in general conference. Dusty’s tale was shocking to me, eye-opening, encouraging, heart-warming, and miraculous. I highly recommend the book.

When we adopt—or readopt—God’s wisdom as the guide to our lives, our lives change, and I was changed by this amazing story. Thank you, Dusty, for your example of faith and humility. I’m grateful to have made your acquaintance through your book.

I Don’t Care

Man and woman holding hands next to water at sunset. Photo credit: Canva.com.

I don’t care about your weaknesses.
I have plenty of my own.
Let’s work on them together.

I don’t care about your sharp words.
They are open wounds that need
the gentle balm of sunlight.

I don’t care about your sins.
You know all of mine.
Why remember what heaven
promises to forget?

I only care about the
piercingly authentic,
perfectly imperfect,
tenderly affirming,
unassuming,
unadorned You.

Michael James Fitzgerald