Second Coming: Blue, Blood, Super Lunar Eclipse, plus Tu BiShvat

Griffith Observatory Video Screenshot

We experienced a once in a lifetime lunar eclipse this morning (if you live in North America). We’ve not seen an eclipse like this one since 1866. Here’s a brief run down:

  • A “blue moon” is the second full moon in a month. They occur every 2.7 years.
  • A “blood moon” is when red light filters through the earth’s atmosphere, casting a reddish hue on the moon during a total eclipse.
  • A “super moon” is when the moon reaches perigee (when it’s orbit is nearest the earth), making it appear much closer and brighter than usual.
  • Tu BiShvat is the Jewish holiday known as the “New Year of the Trees.” It marks when the fruit-bearing trees in Israel begin their new season of growth.

The Lord appointed “lights in the firmament . . . [to] be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years” (Genesis 1:14). “Signs of what” you ask? Let’s look at what the prophet Joel said:

The sun shall be turned into darkness [August 21, 2017], and the moon into blood [January 31, 2018], before the great and the terrible day of the Lord come. (Joel 2:31.)

I’m not saying that we have seen the complete fulfillment of Joel’s prophecy. I’m not predicting the end. Other signs will certainly come our way. They must come, as the scriptures mandate. But I am watching the signposts along the road and preparing myself mentally, physically, and spiritually. That’s our job.

Our job is not to perspire on our way to the Second Coming, but to inspire. I’m not getting hung up on dates or the fabulous and varied calculations so prevalent today. I am hanging onto my faith, however, clinging to anything of eternal value. Everything else will likely be left behind. These are the last days, you know.

Farewell, Thomas S. Monson

IMG_4793On Thursday morning, January 11, I was blessed to attend the viewing of President Thomas S. Monson at the Conference Center where he lay in state in the Hall of the Prophets. There was a presence there, a great peace. I “heard” the whispers of unseen angels. It was solemn yet joyful. I loved the feeling so much that I went again at 3 o’clock that afternoon with a friend. It was an unforgettable experience for me.

I’m sad to see President Monson go, but I am also very happy for him and for his beloved Francis who went before him several years earlier. What a reunion that must have been. The doorway of death is, reportedly, not a frightening one but rather one to look forward to. I look forward to it myself, but not until I complete my mission—on the Lord’s timetable. Let’s not rush it.

My wife and I were able to attend the funeral the next day, Friday, January 12, also in the Conference Center. I’ve watched many of these funerals over satellite or on television, the first being the funeral of President Spencer W. Kimball in November 1985. I was deeply moved by the remarks Friday, especially from President Monson’s daughter, Ann M. Dibb, and from President Russell M. Nelson, on whose shoulders the prophetic mantle has fallen as president of the Quorum of the Twelve.

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I’ve been watching some of President Monson’s past conference talks. If you want to listen to a classic, try this one, “Abundantly Blessed,” the closing address of the April 2008 general conference where he was sustained as president of the Church. It is pretty funny and comforting (about 10 minutes long).

President Monson was sustained as a member of the Twelve when I was five years old. I became acquainted with his positive, kind voice when I was 18, shortly after I joined the Church. I’ll continue to miss him, but I am delighted that his mortal trials are behind him, finally.

God bless you, Tom Monson. You’ve been a light and an example to me for all my adult life. The world needed you. I needed you too.